I Can Run

It has been a while since I have given a gluten free update, so I wanted to post one today. The update could simply be stated in three words.

I CAN RUN!

Those that have known me for years know what a huge accomplishment this is for me.

Running is something that I have always wanted to do and never could because of my severe asthma. I have tried, but I have never in my life ran more than 1/2 a mile and even then I would have to use my inhaler multiple times.

As a child I had trouble running across the playground without wheezing and having an attack. In junior high I tried to play sports, I wanted to play sports, but I was never any good because I simply could not keep up.

I had notes from my doctor as a child excusing me from P.E. if needed, and also excusing me from any running that was required for class.

The fact that I could not run had nothing to do with my athletic ability. I have never been overweight and have been in decent shape most of my life. I simply could not run because of my asthma.

I have been on various medicines over the years trying to control my asthma. I accepted the fact long ago that for me having my asthma under control meant I could do anything, but running or aerobic exercise. I was fine with that because in general I could lead a normal life.

Late last spring though I started to feel different. My lungs and breathing felt different. I felt a strength that I had never felt before. It is hard to explain, but I could tell something was changing.

One day a few months ago I told my husband I wanted to try running. After looking at me a bit strange for a moment, he said sure if you think you can let’s give it a try.

The first few times I tried running I struggled with fear. Afraid to push myself, afraid that I would have an attack that I could not come out of. I would not run alone because I could not get past the fear of what might happen.

But as time went on and I continued running I gained confidence and realized what I was feeling was just the feeling of running, not the asthma. In fact I began to love the feeling of running. I felt an accomplishment that I had never felt before.

For me a big block was to get past the first 1/2 mile because I had never gone past that, but the day I ran a full mile I collapsed on the ground crying. My dream of running died long ago, but now that dream is coming true.

Why my asthma is now under control I do not know exactly. My guess is that my severe reflux is now gone, and I am not refluxing into my lungs like I spent so many years doing. I also know that my overall health is so much better. My body is healing and I think my immune system is thanking me for it.

Gluten free eating has really changed my life.

Disclaimer: I am not a doctor. This is my story. It will not be every one’s story. My asthma did not go away and never will. My asthma is under control. I still take Singulair daily and I carry my inhaler everywhere I go. My asthma will never go totally away and I am aware of that, I am simply sharing the story that after 35 plus years, my asthma is finally under control in a way it has never been.

Lynn's Kitchen Adventures

Comments

  1. Wow, that’s awesome! I’m a runner & don’t have asthma so I won’t pretend to understand what that’s like, but what a huge accomplishment. :) My neighbors growing up had severe asthma, allergies, you name it, so I know how their experience has been and the difficulties they faced. Congratulations! It’s amazing how food can impact our bodies so much.

  2. This is why my naturpathic doctor has recommended I go gluten free (for my asthma, acid reflux & allergies). He also recommended I go milk-free and steer clear of some cheeses (like cheddar) & yogurt. We feel like going dairy free & gluten free has helped me to have more air capacity again. I don’t use the inhaler (though we have one for emergency). My husband has not totally gone gluten free but I’m hoping that it will have a trickle down effect & that he ultimately will go all the way so his asthma improves more…thanks for sharing your story!

  3. So awesome, Lynn! Makes all the food sacrifices worth it for sure.

  4. AllieZirkle says:

    Congrats! What a great story!!

  5. Because of my hubby’s intestinal issues, our family is following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, which is actually more restrictive than going gluten-free. He can’t eat any grains, no sugar, corn, or milk. He can have homemade yogurt, and hard cheeses, though. There are so many interesting articles and books documenting how this diet has changed other people’s lives as well (including actually CURING children of celiac disease). So happy for you!

  6. This post was awesome, Lynn! Thanks for sharing.

  7. Your story is fascinating. I’m so happy to hear you can finally enjoy running. While I don’t like to run, I think it is important for everyone to find an aerobic activity that they enjoy. I prefer biking, but have a daughter who loves to run.

    I’ll be sure to share your story with those I know who have asthma. It seems worth a try to go gluten free.

  8. Hi Lynn,

    I’m not really surprised, but I am thrilled for you! :-) I will share your inspiring story with others. The power of the gluten-free diet is truly amazing. Of course, I am always educating folks on that, especially that all the benefits of living gluten free can take a while to manifest. As you’ve shown, the wait is definitely worth it though! Thanks so much for sharing with us, Lynn.

    Shirley

    • Thanks Shirley, it really is amazing how gf has changed my life. In so many ways I feel like a new person. The last year has been challenging at times, but so worth it. I really can’t believe the difference gf has made for me. People and sites like yours have really helped me adjust to the gf life. And I am so glad it let your comment through and did not spam you! :)

  9. My daughter also had acid reflux and asthma and could not run. She was also a springboard competition diver, so she was neither out of shape or overweight. Since I have celiac disease (and saw some of my old symptoms in her) I convinced her to give up gluten for just one summer. She didn’t realize how much better she got in those three months until she resumed eating gluten in the Fall. That convinced her to go off gluten for good.

    She has been gluten free for two years. She stopped using her long term, daily asthma meds about six months ago. Her acid reflux is much better (but she still takes daily meds for that.) She and I go to the gym often and last week, she got on the treadmill. She ran for about 15 minutes. And didn’t have an asthma attack. We are both very encouraged!

    • Thank you for sharing your daughter’s story. It is really fascinating to me to me to hear about others that have similar stories as mine. It really is amazing how much difference gluten free eating has change my life and the life of so many others. Thank you and I am so glad that your daughter is doing better.

  10. It is very encouraging to hear that you are continuing to have positive results two years later. I have been working on gluten free diet for about 7 months, with some slip ups here and there. Each time I slip up I am reminded how good I feel without the gluten in my diet. I have severe seasonal allergies that bring on asthma and many other side effects. I am hoping that as my system is no longer overloaded by the gluten, that my body will respond well during upcoming allergy seasons. Thanks for honestly sharing your journey.

    • I don’t regret going gluten free at all. It has improved my health and life so much. So, yes 2 yrs later it is very worth it. It does not always make it easy, but it is so worth it. I hope you continue to see the benefits of it.

  11. Hi Lynn, this does not surprise me given the close link between GERD and asthma. The reflux irritates the lungs, too. I’m glad you’ve seen so much improvement.

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  1. […] in their scope. For a very encouraging example, read about Lynn’s (Lynn’s Kitchen Adventures) latest health triumph since going gluten free. […]

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