Do You Need To Grease and Flour Cake Pans? {Ask The Readers}

Today’s question comes from Karin.

Why grease & flour pans when baking. I’ve always only greased my pans and they turn out fine. Should I be flouring them also?

Good question Karin.

Here is where I admit that I only grease and flour my cake pans if I am removing the cake from the pan to frost it or serve it. If it is not a cake I am worried about how it comes out of the pan, I usually skip the flour step.

However, if it is a layer cake that I need to look really nice and want to come out of the pan perfectly,  I usually grease and flour the pan. If it is a chocolate cake, I often use cocoa instead flour for the pan.

Since going gluten free though, I now line the pan with parchment paper instead of the flour. I find that the gluten free flours tend to be too gritty and I do not like the taste that cornstarch gives the cake if I use that in place of the flour. So, for gluten free I like the parchment paper option for cakes that I need to remove from the pan.

My thought is do what works for you. If you have had no problems skipping the flour step, then I say keep doing what you have been doing.

I would love to hear what you all think though? Do you flour your cake pans or not? Is it really necessary?

Lynn's Kitchen Adventures

Comments

  1. Whenever I’m making a cake for a special occasion (birthdays, etc.) I use Wilton’s Cake Release. It’s like a “grease & flour all in one” step. Yes, it does cost a little more (per usage) than grease and flour, but I find that it does an excellent job of keep the cake in great shape for frosting. I found out about this when taking a decorating class 9 years ago, and I finally had to buy my 3rd new bottle just last month. For “everyday” cakes, I usually just Pam the pan– except, I use Cake Release in my bundt pan for ANY occasion- gets in all the creases better :-)

  2. I always grease my pans, but sometimes I dust them with sugar instead of flour. It adds a nice touch to the outside of baked goods and doesn’t leave white spots like flour can.

  3. When I took a Wilton Cake decorating class, they taught us about pan grease. Mix together equal parts flour, crisco, and oil, then brush onto pan. I’ve never had a problem with a cake sticking to the pan when I use this mixture. It can be kept in a plastic food storage tub with lid for 6 months.

  4. I mix approx 1/2 cup Cisco with 1/4 cup flour. Use pastry brush to coat cake pan, especially good for bundt cakes, they come out of the pan with the smoothed surface. Any leftover, I keep in covered container in fridge till next time.

  5. I rarely greese and flour my pans. I bake a pineapple pound cake in a bundt pan for my dad every two weeks. I use Pam baking spray in the bundt pan and I’ve never had any problems of it not coming out perfectly. I have occasionally used parchment or wax paper in layer cake pans and just spray with cooking spray. Other cakes I mostly use cooking spray as well. Way once in a awhile I will either flour and butter or cocoa and butter depending on the cake.

  6. Carla in Mt says:

    Sugar. Dust w/sugar. I’ve been doing that for over 15 yrs. No funny flour taste, & solves the gluten problem.

  7. I always grease mine pans and lightly flour them…however, you can buy some pans thatt are made of kind of a rubbery material so they are flecible. You don’t have to grease these :)

    • I have a silicone Bundt cake pan, and I have had mixed results. One cake came out beautifully, and one was an awful mess!

      • Ah that is what they are called! I bought one recently and used it when making lentil paté – the contents stuck but not sure if that was my fault as I never let the paté cool as per the recipe before turning out from the container.

  8. I don’t always flour cake pans, but I do always grease it. If I am making a cake for a special occasion, I make sure to line the pan with parchment paper; which I think is much more reliable than flour to ensure the cake comes out neatly.

  9. After going Gluten free I started using Cake Release by Wilton, it’s gluten free. It help my cakes to come out perfect every time. I like it doesn’t prevent them from raising. I was surprise how well it did with really sticky dough and bar cookies. I only use parchment when I bake cheesecakes.

  10. Bakers Joy! You can find it at the grocery store and works like a charm. Wedding cakes, bundt cakes, sheet cakes – so easy, and cakes come out perfectly.

  11. I use parchment paper only. I have done hundreds of cakes this way. I can count on it when I am doing wedding cakes. It is fast, non-messy, and adds no nutritional changes. You have to be sure to run a knife or spatula around the edge of the pan before removing because the sides do stick.

  12. Sarah Cassill says:

    For cakes served out of the pan I spray with Pam real good then sprinkle with sugar! It makes the bottom really moist and sweet!

    I’ve read to use grease and cocoa powder for chocolate cakes!

  13. A friend told me to mix equal parts vegetable shortening, vegetable oil and flour (she calls it “cake grease”), and I’ve not have had anything stick since using this mix. I use one tablespoon each, and any extra will keep for a few weeks.

    I’ve also heard if using a box cake mix, you can grease the pan(s), then use a bit of the mix to “flour” without ending up with white residue.

  14. when I make carrot cake I spray the angel cake pan with non stick spray & then dust heavy with cinnamon/sugar. cake comes out great & taste better than without the cinn/sugar coating.

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